Gold Coast Colony’s Northern Territories Protectorate Muslims on Haj: Passports and Repatriation Deposits, 1897-1950

Authors

  • Susannah Doris Essah Lecturer, Department of History, University of Ghana

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.55559/sjaes.v1i02.12

Keywords:

Haj, Muslim pilgrims, Northern Territories Protectorate, Gold Coast Colony, Passports, Repatriation Deposits

Abstract

Ghana had a census for the Muslim population in 2017 and 2021, a national census including Muslims. Two international airports were being constructed to render three international airports for Muslims to embark on planes at Accra, Cape Coast and Tamale for the annual haj pilgrimage in Saudi Arabia. This paper is situated in the north, where the Gold Coast colonial government wrote diplomatic letters for the dispersed Islamic people in the Northern Territories Protectorate who travelled on haj. In 1910, British colonial officers and the Gold Coast colonial government made policies that met the Saudi monarch’s requirement that Muslim pilgrims had to travel with British passports. During the colonial era, the Gold Coast colonial government allotted passports to Muslim pilgrims in the Northern Territories Protectorate from the Gold Coast and Nigeria and controlled the finances they deposited for repatriation during haj.

Downloads

Download data is not yet available.

References

Wilks, Ivor. Wa and the Wala: Islam and polity in northwestern Ghana. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1989

Lovejoy, P. E. (1982). Polanyi’s “Ports of Trade”: Salaga and Kano in the Nineteenth Century. Canadian Journal of African Studies / Revue Canadienne Des Études Africaines, 16(2), 245–277. https://doi.org/10.2307/484296

Nii‐K Plange (1984) The Colonial state in Northern Ghana: the political economy of pacification, Review of African Political Economy, 11:31, 29-43, DOI: 10.1080/03056248408703598

Schildkrout, E. (1970). Strangers and Local Government in Kumasi. The Journal of Modern African Studies, 8(2), 251-269. doi:10.1017/S0022278X00019650

Amis, W. “Law and Policy: Relating to the Natives of the Gold Coast and Nigeria.” Journal of the Royal African Society 12, no. 45 (1912): 17-51.

Bari, A Comprehensive History; King, “The Pilgrimage to Mecca,” 62.

MOTADEL, D. (2012). ISLAM AND THE EUROPEAN EMPIRES. The Historical Journal, 55(3), 831-856. doi:10.1017/S0018246X12000325

Bari, O. A Comprehensive History of Muslims and Religion in Ghana. Accra: Dezine Focus, 2009.

Aderinto, S. "Journey to Work: Transnational Prostitution in Colonial British West Africa." Journal of the History of Sexuality 24, no. 1 (2015): 99-124. https://doi.org/10.7560/JHS24105

Ochsenwald, William, "Islam and Loyalty in the Saudi Hijaz, 1926-1939." Die Welt des Islams, 47, No. 1 (2007), 8-11. https://doi.org/10.1163/157006007780331471

Published

2022-06-17

How to Cite

Doris Essah, S. (2022). Gold Coast Colony’s Northern Territories Protectorate Muslims on Haj: Passports and Repatriation Deposits, 1897-1950. Sprin Journal of Arabic-English Studies, 1(02), 82–91. https://doi.org/10.55559/sjaes.v1i02.12

Issue

Section

Articles